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Implementing Adaptation Strategies to Climate Change

Under the UNFCCC convention members are asked to communicate on their priorities, plans and required support to adapt to climate change. As a result of this, EAC member states have published different national documents including national communications (NC), intended nationally determined contributions (INDC), national adaptation plans of actions (NAPA) and national adaptation plans (NAP).

Under the UNFCCC convention members are asked to communicate on their priorities, plans and required support to adapt to climate change. As a result of this, EAC member states have published different national documents including national communications (NC), intended nationally determined contributions (INDC), national adaptation plans of actions (NAPA) and national adaptation plans (NAP).

The 6th EAC Climate Negotiators’ Forum took place on the sidelines of the UNFCCC COP23 in Bonn, Germany on 8 November. The objective of the meeting was to discuss climate adaptation communication, based on an issue note developed by CUTS team in Geneva on “Possible Features of Adaptation Communication of the Paris Agreement”, as well as Country Update Notes received from country partners that gave an overview of “Implementing adaptation strategies to climate change: Views from EAC farmers &agro-processors”.

The Country Update Notes sought to obtain the views of various private stakeholders (i.e. farmers and agro-processors) on their needs to be able to coherently adapt to climate change; their views on the NAP and NDC of their country, focusing on the relevancy and inclusivity of those plans of actions; as well as what should be included in their government strategy when revising those plans, to be able to address their climate adaptation challenges.

Most of the interviewed farmers and agro-processors have reported a drastic loss in profits due to climate change. Their most pressing needs are sustainable ways to develop their products and new methods of maintaining and scaling up their level of production that would allow more profits and contribute to sustainable development. Some of them have already taken some steps to adapt (i.e. new methods of irrigation, storing seeds and grain, and planting of different and more diversified products), and many have also reported increased meetings and exchange of ideas amongst themselves, which has enabled diversification of their growing methods.

Concerning the issue note, it is based on a comparative analysis of the EAC member states´ adaptation communication, striving to identify gaps, overlaps and good examples across the different documents. The analysis is categorised around the communication of (sectoral) adaptation priorities, implementation plans and needs. Carrying out the analysis, one finds both content related overlaps and clear incoherence (specific examples can be found in the issue note, and in its annex).

Most of the documents organise their identified adaptation priorities under sectors such as health, forestry, agriculture and water. It is hence obvious that specific sectors are mentioned repeatedly across the different documents. However, some documents - add further sectors to the already popular ones. This can cause confusion regarding the sectors that are in most urgent need of adaptation to climate change. However, it has been noted by a participant that the factors of context and timing in which the documents have bee developed should be take into account by the authors as well as readers of the issue note.

Looking at the implementation plans, the linking of actions to sectoral objectives is a perceived common pattern in most documents. However, most of the implementation plans only give broad adaptation options in each sector of adaptation need whilst ignoring specified aspects such as timeframe, budget and an action menu. As an exception to the vague formulation of implementation plans, Burundi and Rwanda´s NCs provide detailed action plans of adaptation for different sectors. However, it was also noted that adaptation actions are site specific and depends on national circumstances. It therefore depends on the size and homogeneity of a state as well as the institutional and policy arrangements within. Therefore, being either broad at the policy level, or specific is neither wrong nor the ideal.

It is recommended in the note that in the preparation of future adaptation communication, EAC member states should make more efficient use of limited available resources. Towards the preparation of a new adaptation document, focus should fall on a clear list of sectoral priorities and implementation plans, which are tailored to sectoral adaptation priorities and provide information on the time and financial frame. Deriving from these implementation plans, in order to achieve adaptation in prioritised sectors, a new adaptation document should present specific financial, technological and capacity building needs. By means of such a level of detail, it becomes easier for (international) stakeholders to get involved in the adaptation process and provide the responsible ministries for adaptation with the necessary support.

Discussions

In the discussion with EAC climate negotiators, the challenge of collecting accurate data and analyse it was highlighted. To ensure stakeholders’ involvement, they have put in place institutional arrangements to prepare their adaptation communication, but you need to install/be aware of key sectors’ focal points, put in place expert groups, and have a specific team in the ministry of environment to coordinate these arrangements (i.e. being able to compile, analyse and archive the data by sector).

It can be complicated in some countries to communicate bilaterally with some stakeholders (i.e. CSO, NGO), as such communication channels are often challenging to put in place, even if their views are critical to be added in adaptation communication reports.

Way Forward

The next forum will take place in March 2018, using electronic means. Negotiators are invited to send any requests to CUTS on topics to be discussed.

Issues such as funds’ allocation for adaptation, and transparency have been mentioned.

 

Ongoing Discussions

  • Burundi WTO discussion

    Feb 19, 2016 | 09:29 am

    We can discuss WTO issues here for Burundi

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    Lets discuss SSM issues

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  • trade forum discussion

    Feb 19, 2016 | 04:43 am

    Let us discuss topics of MTS to support our delegates in Geneva. Best regards, Julien Grollier Programme Officer CUTS International, Geneva Tel: +41 22 7346080 Fax: +41 22 7343914 Email: j...@cuts.org Web: www.cuts-geneva.org Skype: cuts.grc [image: CUTS-Rlogo.jpg]

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    Feb 18, 2016 | 11:38 am

    this is a test discussion body.

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