Fisheries is a critical issue for sustainable development of all EAC countries, whether having access to the ocean or relying on inland fishing. This meeting gathered East African negotiators at both UNFCCC and the WTO, who shared perspectives on the way forward for fisheries in both fora.

Despite the importance of marine resources for the environment, food security and economic growth, destructive practices such as overfishing has dramatically reduced the size of fish resources worldwide.

Despite the huge potential for agriculture in the EAC, the region remains a net food importer relying on imports to sustain its population. Trade-distorting domestic support in agriculture remains a major challenge preventing the EAC from integrating in the world markets. At this meeting, East African negotiators to the WTO examined the prospects of this issue in the run-up to this year's ministerial conference.

SMEs comprise 90 per cent of all firms globally and are the largest source of employment. However, WTO’s 2016 World Trade Report indicates that SMEs are highly vulnerable to trade barriers given their limited access to finance, technology, skilled labour, and markets; and recognizes the importance of making international trade more inclusive to them. As consultations are ongoing at the WTO in this regard, East African negotiators met to gather inputs and discuss the chalenges faced by their SMEs.

Comment le développement de l'agro-industrie au Burundi peut-il devenir plus conscient du climat, profiter du commerce et assurer la sécurité alimentaire?

How can agro-processing development in Kenya become more climate-aware, trade-driven and food security-enhancing?

How can agro-processing development in Rwanda become more climate-aware, trade-driven and food security-enhancing?

How can agro-processing development in Tanzania become more climate-aware, trade-driven and food security-enhancing?

How can agro-processing development in Uganda become more climate-aware, trade-driven and food security-enhancing?

Government procurement is increasingly attracting attention in Free Trade Agreements and regional integration. While liberalizing government procurement can help public procurers get better value for money, it may also reduce policy space for using some trade-distorting government procurement methods aimed at promoting enterprise development domestically. Against this backdrop, East African negotiators reflected on their potential priorities and interests in liberalizing their government procurement sector, based on their stakeholders’ feedback from the ground.

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